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the two nations. we'll have the latest on his trip from dehli. >> and it's still london's fashion week, yes, strutting its stuff, but how luxury brands are faring. we talk to ceo angela aarons. we'll hear from her later in the show. >>> and taking the positive u.s. housing numbers from the nhab numbers. we'll be in new york with analysis at 11:45 cet. >> the italian election race is heating up. there is less than a week before voters head to the polls. comedian turns politician beppe grillo, in fact, is owes closing in on sylvia berlusconi for second place. official polls can no longer be published. the private polls seen by reuter s suggest mario monti may, in fact b with be something of a spoiler. >> and the election largely coming down to five key candidates. the front-runner is bersani. he's the leader of the center left pd party, calling for growth measures alongside monte's plan. sylvia berlusconi is threatening to make a political comeback despite corruption scandals. we've mentioned the comedian beppe grillo. at the same time, the former caretaker mario monti, he's been struggl
's 12:00 noon here in london. 7:00 a.m. in washington and 1:00 p.m. in the hague where officials say they have unearthed football match-fixing on a scale not seen before. the european police organization stays scam involves millions in bribeds and a crime syndicate based in asia. it results in some high-profile matches including the champions league. >> among the 380 or so suspicious matches identified in this case, they are qualification matches for the european league football championships, two u.a. champions league matches including one played in england and several top-flight matches in the european national league. in addition another 300 suspicious matches were identified outside europe in africa, asia and south and central america. so this is match-fixing activity on a scale not seen before involving hundreds of criminals and corrupted officials and players affecting hundreds of matches and generating very large amounts of elicit profits. it is also the work of a sophisticated international crime syndicate. based in asia and working with criminal facilitators around europe.
, you're off to dublin, then. no, no. no, london. oh. hi. how are you? service? assumpta, customers. >> assumpta: yeah, i'll be right with you, padraig. still celebrating? the rescue of the orchid and the badger, the owl and the pussycat. come on, padraig. putting the road around the wood is not going to make any difference to the development. that remains to be seen. whatever the outcome, it doesn't have to be personal. i heard you were having a little lunch time celebration. what do you mean? i've come to mess it up for you. you must think i'm a right eejit. you stuck those artefacts up on the site. and don't pretend you didn't. look at them. pathetic. now these bones haven't been in the ground for years. and this arrowhead. it's varnished. oh, dear. we told the council though. i don't care who you told. they'll take one look at this rubbish and laugh in your faces. so you can say goodbye to your wood. it's a wake you're having now. you can drink to the corpse. niamh. dad? yes, anything. do me a favour, dad. put the road round the wood. niamh. come on now. if not for my sake, dad,
south west london, on behalf of my constituent, mr aziz, who has pulmonary hypertension, chronic lung disease and left heart disease. those at nhs south west london will not respond to my correspondence asking whether they will agree to look at allowing professor madden, the world famous cardiologist, to prescribe sildenafil for mr aziz's treatment. i can get no response and my constituent might die, should he not get a decision. >> i am very happy to take up the case that the honorable lady quite rightly raises in the house. if she gives me the details, i will see what i can do to try to get a better answer from the health authority. >> each year many dozens of my constituents have to sell their houses to pay for social care, which is random and unfair. does the prime minister agree that the proposals announced last week will at last start to mitigate this issue? >> my honorable friend makes a very important point. as he says, it is completely random who can end up suffering from dementia and then suddenly find that, because they could be spending five, 10 or even more years in a car
majesty. but where did this arrogance come from? at the national gallery in london, one of the real king richard's most intimate possessions is on display. it's an object that perfectly sums up his sense of divine destiny. this is the famous wilton diptych, 600 years old, and still so wonderfully vibrant and colorful and meaningful. this was richard's own personal traveling altarpiece. he'd simply open it up, kneel down, and pray. you see him here. you see his curly golden hair, kneeling, with three saints-- john the baptist holding the lamb of god, saint edward the confessor and saint edmund. and they are all looking over to the right here where there's this wonderful representation of the virgin mary and the christ child surrounded by 11 angels, one of whom is carrying the flag of saint george and she seems to be offering or presenting it to richard. so there you have it. this is how richard sees himself in sole and divine possession of england. to be fair to richard, he wasn't the only one who thought himself divinely appointed. it was taken as rea
that downton abbey experience but also ssme of the great sites thht you cannsee in london and -3 arounddeurope." if you're on aabudget you can hopp &pa train to the castle frrm london.gill says: "the aaiest paddiigton station anddyou go about a orty fivveminute trrin ide out. it's a very ppeasanttride." or rent - a roadster and choose your own addenture to highclere..murphhy - says: whatti would suggest iss people ttink about is mmking london you huu of your stay -&pand divinn down and experiencing hiihclere castle -3 for the day and thee driving 3& vikiin river cruisss is one of tte spoosors of downton abbey.gill says: "they're offering an extensioo of one of their existing rivee cruises to england. it consssts of a three day toou of londonnand then it movvs on po some of the countryyide -3& including a tour of hhghclere castle. murphh says: because &pthese folks buy n bulk bring hundreds, if not thhusaads of people to highclere castle -3&pthey get a special rate at the hotee. speciallrate n terrs &pof trannfer. special rate in - terms of ent
the newly wed churchill bought a house in london, his mother decorated and churchill at the dining room at the back of the house. they employed a coke, two made and about their. roy jenkins, a very good biographer set of churchill, quote, he was not good at bilateral conversation but with the table he could also be brilliant. if i could dine with stalin once a week there would be no trouble, churchill said. the british and commonwealth countries had been at war for over a year. when pearl harbor was attacked churchill knew that the u.s. would be at war and wanted to assure that america would not concentrate on fighting japan first instead of hitler in europe. churchill at once decided to travel to washington to meet with roosevelt and move into the white house for three weeks. was this the beginning of the special relationship? perhaps. now the british have a formidable ally. winter chill lived with roosevelt and white house sharing every meal but not breakfast they agreed among other things to establish a combined chief of staff. military staff from each of the services would work toge
this 500-year-old skeleton found under a parking lot 90 miles northwest of london is indeed the remains of lost british king richard iii. later this morning we'll get the best guess from forensic scientists as to what king richard 30s would have looked like. the details are amazing, folks. they'll show off a full reconstruction of his head based on the bone structure of his skull. a live report from london. it's coming up in our next hour of "early start." >>> the party is still on in baltimore. the city will honor the super bowl champion ravens today with a victory parade. the team returned home to baltimore yesterday after beating the 49ers in super bowl xlvii, the second super bowl win for the ravens franchise. festivities begin at city hall this morning, ending with a free celebration at the ravens home base. >>> you can see beyonce was electrifying at the super bowl, right? you cannot say she killed the lights. we go live to new orleans next for what could have caused the blackout if it wasn't the halftime show. >>> the american city with the worst traffic gridlock. can you guess w
continues to recover, today the taliban are the focus of talks in london between the leaders of pakistan and afghanistan. the goal is to create a more stable environment for when nato forces leave afghanistan in 2014. the mission is to get the taliban to negotiate peace, but what are the chances? >> 12 years into a war that has cost 440 british lives, the prime minister invited the leaders of both afghanistan and pakistan to talk about the threats facing them all. >> the united kingdom will continue to stand firmly behind both countries as they work together to bring peace and stability to the region. finally, the progress we have achieved today sends a very clear message to the taliban. now is the time for everyone to participate in a peaceful political process in afghanistan. >> as british troops prepared to withdraw from afghanistan and handoff to afghan forces, intense combat like this is rare now. the military believe they have done their job and that this insurgency, like all others, needs a political solution. >> the clock is ticking. we have until the end of 2014, maybe not as lo
just received news that the bill has passed in parliament. let's go live to our correspondent in london, who is following the vote in parliament for us. what was the majority? >> it has really only just been passed -- 400 for the bill and 155 against it, which is quite a lot against it. most would have voted for the bill, but a large portion, really, of the conservative party have voted against it. >> ok, now, where is the political upset in all of this for the prime minister, for david cameron? some say that this vote could leave a legacy of bitterness within his own conservative party. >> well, yes, definitely. one british paper actually made an interesting comment and said the conservative party has had decades of being divided over europe and now david cameron has found an entirely new subject to split the party. humor aside, it has really been a struggle between traditionalists and modernizers. traditionalists have been quite vocal. one mp promoting the merciless prison of equality and another saying that he fears for the future of the children, but unlike the debate on europe, dav
experienced group reading aloud in a west london library. it is a weekly event. one of 300 groups organized across britain by the router res organization. everyone is welcome. the atmosphere is friendly and relaxed. >> i feel that in the time i have been here, i have enjoyed myself. i have learned a lot about literature. i think i have developed as a person. >> it is more than just reading and talking about a book. it is about engaging with others in a social enterprise. she also reads in hospitals and prisons. she says the venue makes no difference. >> i think i have always known that reading is therapeutic. when people could not read, maybe there were less books around. people would sit around and read a story. >> another group, this one in london's mayfair neighborhood. >> 15 or 20 people sitting on a rug, gathering. with no other agenda than listening to a story -- it is a beautiful thing. >> the groups vary, but all provide a safe environment for talking. if topics straight into the awkward or too personal, the leader can return to the text -- stray into the awkward or too personal, th
reproduction of the human body is now on display at london's science museum. robotics experts have built what they've dubbed a million dollar bionic man deplete with artificial organs, synthetic blood, and robotic limbs. he's 6'6" and he was put together during the momently titled documentary "how to build a bionic man." his synthetic blood that we mentioned can bind and give off oxygen just like the real thing. the man called rex by his creators also has an artificial trachea, which means that he soon may be able to speak. >>> many cities north of us are bracing for what could be a huge storm. so let's find out how it's going to affect us. howard has the forecast. >> yeah, jc, looks like this one is just going to miss us although we could get a little snow out of it. i'll let you know when that may happen and it certainly feels like it. look at the temperatures as we go to break. it's chilly. 34 lovettsville. 37 dumfries and 38 in bowie. we'll have the very interesting forecast, an epic storm in the northeast coming up in just >>> i've been combing through the retailer websites to find you -
at the shard, london's highest building. ben fogle joins us there. >> reporter: it's just been joined by this a newer, taller, glassier version, new tower of london, the shard. it's ever changing canvas. you blink and a new building appears. a lot of people look at this and go it's not finished. >> it does tend to look a little unfinished. none the worse for that, it's marvelously visible from all over london. >> reporter: it looks pretty striking from this distance. should we have a look at it from the closer up? >> can't wait. >> reporter: let's go. shall we go up? >> sounds like a good idea. let's go. >> reporter: we're heading to the viewing platform 800 feet above london. >> thank you very much. that's fantastic. >> reporter: what i find amazing, i have lived in london all my life. i've never seen it from this perspective. we've got a 365 view. >> i know. >> famous gerkin i recognize. >> remarkable view of the tower of london, isn't it? >> reporter: in the distance i can see the olympic sites. we have this brand new building, state-of-the art and we've got some of the oldist buil
attempt to get a response from southwest london nhs on behalf of my constituents, who has hypertension, chronic lung disease and heart disease. they will not respond to my correspondents as to whether they will agree to look at allowing the professor, the world-famous cardiologist in his prescription for his treatment. i can get no response am a constituent made i should do not get a physician? >> i'm very happy to take up the case the honorable lady quite rightly raises in the house because she gives me the details i will see what i can do to get a better answer from health authorities. >> thank you, mr. speaker. each year many dozens of my constituents have to sell the house in order to pay for social care. this is random and unfair. with the prime minister agree with you that the proposal announced last week will litigate this issue? >> i think my friend makes an important point, as he said it is completely random who can end up suffering from dementia and then suddenly find that because they could be spending five, 10 or even more years in a care home, it completely wipes out all o
others may see as a disability. here's dr. gupta. >> two olympics, six gold medals, beijing, london, a landful of world records, world championship titles and six london marathon wins. david weir is one of the top pair everyone had athletes in the world competing in long distance races. he's also confined to a wheelchair. all of it pure upper body strength. >> i couldn't feel my leg buzz they can't move. it's called spinal cord transection. it was damage to the nerves in my spine. the doctors don't know the how or when or why. so it was a disability from birth really. >> he was just a young boy when he decided not to let his disability keep him from his dreams of being an athlete. >> i was into sport very early. at school, it was my best subject. pe. i wasn't very good at anything else. so i knew that i had to get the sport right if i wanted to succeed in life. and i was very lucky and i was talented at an early age, and wheelchair racing took over my life. >> he began training in ernest at age 8 joining team great britain by 11 and started winning medals at the age of 25. >> i've d
a response from southwest london nhs on behalf of my constituents, who has hypertension, chronic lung disease and heart disease. they will not respond to my correspondents as to whether they will agree to look at allowing the professor, the world-famous cardiologist in his prescription for his treatment. i can get no response am a constituent made i should do not get a physician? >> i'm very happy to take up the case the honorable lady quite rightly raises in the house because she gives me the details i will see what i can do to get a better answer from health authorities. >> thank you, mr. speaker. each year many dozens of my constituents have to sell the house in order to pay for social care. this is random and unfair. with the prime minister agree with you that the proposal announced last week will litigate this issue? >> i think my friend makes an important point, as he said it is completely random who can end up suffering from dementia and then suddenly find hat because they could be spending five, 10 or even more years in a care home, it completely wipes out all of their savings that th
the bard of our london bureau-- mark phillips. >> reporter: there was a time, archaeologists have discovered, when being king of england was a dead-end job. it certainly was for richard iii whose battle battered bones have been found stuffed into a grave definitely not fit for a king. a grave that was lost for 500 years and discovered under what is now a parking lot. the skeleton's curved spine matched the historic tale of the hunchback king. the fearsome wounds matched the story of a king killed in battle. but it took modern science to find an ancient king. d.n.a. analysis comparing the genetic code in the bones with that of michael ibsen, a descendent discovered 16 generations later. >> the phone rings and someone says "i'm a historian, you're related to richard iii, congratulations"? >> more or less. i think he probably started the conversation by saying "i'm not a lunatic." >> now is the winter of our a lunatic." >> now is the winter of our discontent. >> reporter: not now, most of what the world has known about richard has come from shakespeare who died trying to cling to his
. this mockup is based on the skull remained found in a dig 90 miles northwest of london. yesterday, archaeologists confirmed this skeleton is that indeed of the long lost king. famous from richard iii. talking to a woman behind the search in the next hour. fascinating stuff. >>> david letterman face to face with the butt of many of his jokes. he brought a tasty prop and a healthy dose of humor. >> i have made a few jokes, not just one or two, intermittent. but -- >> i didn't know this was going to be this long. >> now, wait a minute. maybe you can do that sort of thing in your state, buddy. >> i don't care if you're funny. from my perspective, the joke is funny, i laugh, even if it's about me. if it's not funny, i don't laugh. but i've never felt like it was anything that really bugged me all that much. >> now, what percentage of the jokes have you found funny? >> about 40%. roughly. >> can i just say, he's got good comic timing. >> great comic timing a great sport and smart to come on with the doughnut. you never know when you might get hungry, right? >> there you go. >>> in just
's 600 people. it's amazing. still talk to him in london over the weekend. but i went to london. much discussion about this. my mother was not at all happy. i got on a train went to london and worked for a naval officer, the royal navy office and i joined up. my 18th birthday. and i waited two or three weeks. and then i was asked to get to scott with. and, of course, always say. so turned into a naval establishment and hms duke. and i worked in an office there. so i arrived there. i was assigned to a man called richard helms. and he became a great fan of roosevelt who came over trying to win support for the war. of course and sure. i certainly could not type. but then about two months later the rather large lady walked into the office and said there were looking for volunteers to man the boats out in the harbor and the south of england. so go off the harbor boat. and she -- a look to her and thought, she must've been the one responsible. we had huge polymerous we take issue with and huge profits, you know, anyway, i put my name down as a volunteer. of course then i got to promise. the
the war thing ?appened i >> the animals were over. i was in l.a., and i did not want to go to london and face the press. i love l.a.. it was great. i said, i am going to the actors studio. i signed up for the actors studio and had a great teacher, and i was doing well. i really enjoyed it. they said, if you want to do that, you have got to earn money in the field you are in. put a new band together. they said, we see you as a black band. i saw this events that had a trombone, trumpets, saxophone, bass. i said, we cannot take this on the road and make money. eventually we got it down to six brands and myself. -- bands and myself. it was wonderful for a couple years. it was really good, but the surprising thing was i got a shot. for the first time i realized black americans did not understand what the blues was all about. once it went on record, they sold. tavis: we have this conversation all the time, so i feel you on that. tell me about "til your river runs dry!" >> it began with a conversation -- a conversation with gorbachev. we got a song in the works. the problem is water in this
that in london. it helped to define not only her role, but in a larger sense, the access the americans were to have with their president. >> that is the only model the washingtons and the rest of the founding government had, the very european monarchies they taught to distance themselves. where do the washington strother example from? >> people see washington always has a strong, marble leader appeare. he was more than a statute. he liked to talk to his associates. he was criticized as a general because he liked to talk to his staff before making a decision. in government, he thought all the best minds in the country would get together and make the right decision. and we were the first modern republic. it is hard for us to understand there was nobody like us. whatever they did mattered. it was important. >> let's take a snapshot. this was from the first census ever done. the census maker was thomas jefferson. here are some of the facts they gathered about the noon -- the united states. the 13 states had a population of just under 4 million. 750 of those were black. only 9% were free. the pe
scary moments in london after a man with a pair of knives that tourists outside buckingham palace. police approached the man to stop them and he pointed the knife that them and that's when the stun guns came out. police arrested him. still >> i had, jacqui >> students at potomac mills school have the day off today and it is not because of the super bowl and not because of bad weather. >> it turns out and 8 7 and purse krater work in the stands and if they admitted that gutted a upper the two older kids messed -- missed but a check out the video. look at that. the crowd goes wild. the gym erupted into cheers. he got an unexpected day home from school. >> are you a hero with the forecast? >> would you like a little bit of snow again? cloudy and 36 degrees at 3:00 and late this evening and overnight, a light dusting and temperatures
report from nbc's keir simmons in london. >> today you can see that i'm alive. i can speak. i can see you. i can see everyone. and i'm getting better day by day. >> reporter: malala yousafzai's first words on camera were to thank others. >> because all the people, men, women, children, all of them have prayed for me. and because of these prayers, god has given me this new life. >> reporter: she almost died. shot in the head last october by islamic extremists, because she fought for the right of young women to have an education. on saturday, she walked to the operating room. for five more hours of surgery. doctors implanted a titanium plate and a sophisticated hearing aid, repairing where the bullet smashed her skull and left her deaf in one ear. 24 hours later, malala was talking again. >> i can also walk a little bit. i can talk. and i'm feeling better. and it doesn't seem that i had a very big operation. >> reporter: other patients might have complained. malala stayed focused. >> the thing is that my mission is the same, to help people. and i would do that. >> reporter: the medical team
here at the tower of london. now, though, 500 years later, he gets a measure of revenge. finally he is the center of attention. for royal historians like sally dixon smith, it's history come alive. >> it's a fascinating murder mystery. all of richard's life. that we can still find archaeology like that and particularly under a municipal car park, i think that's fabulous. >> reporter: the king in the parking lot. history dug up and maybe rewritten. mark phillips, cbs news, london. >>> the u.s. postal service is honoring a civil rights icon on what would have been her 100th birthday. the rosa parks forever stamp was unveiled yesterday at the henry ford museum in michigan. police in montgomery, alabama, arrested parks in 1955 for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. she passed away in 2005. >>> coming up after your local news on "cbs this morning," we'll go to midland city, alabama, for the latest on the end of that hostage standoff involving a young boy. >>> plus, the battle over spending cuts scheduled to kick in on march 1. we'll hear from ho
're entering the seventh day of the hostage situation in alabama. >>> a disturns in london. >>> what the game is all about, the commercials. >> the commercial between the supermodel and the nerd went on and on. >>> when she performed at the halftime performance, she brought her a-game. >>> and all that matters. >> i want to make sure we're doing everything we can to make sure the sport is safer. >>> on "cbs this morning." >> 30 years from now the nfl will still be here bigger and bett better thannen and you'll probably be here still doing "face the nation." captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." the baltimore ravens are waking up as nfl champions after an unforgettable super bowl. they beat san francisco, 34-31, in game that featured a half-hour blackout followed by a staring comeback. >> the ravens and the fans celebrated inside the super dome after the 49ers drive fell a few yards short. they were wild in the streets of baltimore. police say there were a few disturbances but nothing serious. and he was inside the nnfl at te super bowl when the power went out. first jeff
in london where he was a pianist. so he was very artistic, if you like. and what i think is so clever about this painting is, yes, sure it says in a literal way with the ring and the objects around that this is what this man is about, but it's the expression as well. there's a feeling of sensitivity introspection, fragility. we need to value this intriguing object, and jackson, ken jackson although dead, was a considerable force in portrait painting in the area, and it needs to be taken seriously. he's not that prominent. perhaps one day he will become so. but i would comfortably value this picture at £800, 900 possibly even £1,000. but of course, its value is that it's. oh, yeah. it was never be sold. i would never sell it. no, no. these are lovely vintage clothes, but a lot of people end up taking them to a charity shop. why did you keep them? well, i think it was my mother who kept them, and then because i do tend to hoard things, i just kept them in the box where they've been all this time. right, and this lovely early one here lovely chiffon and lace. w
condition. oh, good. i mean, this dish was made in london. it was made in about 1780s... right. gosh. so back in the 18th century. yeah. and, yes, well, it looks brand new, doesn't it? it looks extraordinary. a pretend chinaman. he's not really a chinaman. he's a lambeth chinaman. that's where he was made, and, well, see, he's sitting in a chinese-style landscape painted in the bold colors of london delft. it's very bright red, and the use of the blue with these little scratched-in lines, such a typical feature, especially of the lambeth delftware. yes. so not just one for £5, but another one, also £5. yes, also £5. and another-- well, actually, this is a little bit more convincing, i suppose, because you got one chip there. that's not bad, is it? no. i mean, i think they're beautiful. i don't mind the chips at all. i think it sort of adds a bit to them. it shows their age a bit more. it's--it's a nice design, really. there's a bird flying there, a rather comical bird. the influence here is chinese porcelain from the early 18th century, and that's what this was imitating. this one-- a
around the corner from us here in london. thank you for coming by. >> pleasure. >> do you agree with what the white house is saying and what a lot of these ceos seem to be saying which is that the country is suffering a lack of competitiveness because of the lack of immigration policy? is this the next issue on the agenda? >> i think it's one of the issues. look at how they acted after 2008. i mean, the recession technically in the u.s. was smaller than it was in the eurozone. but the measures that were taken in the u.s. at that point in time in 2008 and 2009 were a lot more stringent than they were in the eurozone. if you look at the job cuts at that point in time, if you look at insolvencies, i think it's a lot more stringent than it happened here. but the flip side of the coin is the way it worked itself out of the recession i think is more impressive than what we're seeing here. wouldn't you say that has more to do with avoiding a sovereign debt crisis by virtue of not being a haphazard monetary union? >> that's part of it. but also, i think the way the u.s. manage itself out of the c
and theoretical instruction. he trained wrestlers for the 2012 olympics, then led them to london. they won three medals, gold, silver, and bronze. but that was less than the team brought home from the 2008 summer games. he lost some of his shine. then the abuse allegations surfaced. he admitted he was lofty to women and was only trying to get the best out of them. >> translator: in judo, you compete at the olympic games to win medals. and i believe that is our mission. i admit that i felt pressure to make the athletes strong in a short period of time. >> reporter: sports figures have criticized sonoda's win-at-all-costs attitude. >> translator: i imagined he felt a lot of pressure to win at the games, but his passion took a wrong turn. >> reporter: international judo federation spokespersons say sonoda's actions do not reflect the spirit and ferocity of their sport. they say judo should enhance physical and mental abilities. anything that goes against that principle has no place. the fact that modern judo was developed in japan is another reason the scandal is getting so much attention. but japa
disturbance in london where police used a taser to subdue a knife wielding man outside buckingham palace. >>> for some the big game is all about the commercials. >> that kiss between the model and the nerd went on and on and on. >> superdome, one, two, three, four. >> when beyonce took the stage at the superdome for the halftime performance, she brought her "a" game. >> and all that matters. >> i want to make sure we're doing everything we can to make the sport safer. for those of us that like to see a big hit, we're probably going to be occasionally frustrated. >> on "cbs this morning." >> 30 years from now the nfl will definitely still be here bigger and better, and you'll probably still be here doing "face the nation." >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." the baltimore ravens are waking up as nfl champions after an unforgettable super bowl. they beat san francisco 34-31 in a game that featured a half hour blackout followed by a stirring comeback. >> the ravens and their fans celebrated inside the superdome after the 49ers' final drive fell a few yards short. there w
home in london, a place that is his invention headquarters. >> this is in the guinness book of records. have devices inside there. when you put your foot down, every time you do that, a little tweak of electricity comes through. it is injected into your mobile phone battery. i call myself an inventor. this workshop is where it all began. the is a graveyard of thousand domestic appliances. i am known for making the clockwork radio. that is how i wound up. i was watching the program about the spread of hiv aids in africa. the only way they could stop this disease was through radio. there was a problem. most people in africa did not have electricity. the only other form of electricity was in the form of batteries. i am thinking to myself, all those years ago, i could see myself with an old-fashioned gramophone. -- wound this thing up this thing up. it produces the volume of sound. there must be enough energy in the spring. it would drive a radio. i've only got one arm. that goes there. top -- you canhe undo the top. that doesn't for you. here we are. everybody is doing their own version o
old. by then he had already become one of the london's most important men of letters and possibly the world's greatest wit. but that didn't stop england from charging him with 25 counts of gross indecencies and conspiracies to commit gross indecencies when he was 40 years old. the prosecution called young male witnesses to testify about the criminal sexual behavior oscar wilde engaged in when homosexual sex was a crime in england and most of the world. during the trial, the prosecutor read a poem by lord alfred douglas that wilde said he admired and asked wilde to interpret one of the lines of the poem. the prosecutor's question was, quote, what is the love that dare not speak its name? oscar wilde gave a long answer at the end of which the court transcript indicates, loud applause mingled with some hiss. the sex crime defendant facing ruination as he sat in the witness stand answered the question this way. the love that dare not speak its name in this century is such a great affection of an elder for a younger man, such a plato made the very basis of his philosophy and in michela
insurance from lloyds of london. >> i'm almost speechless with excitement. >> reporter: this is actually the third year gardeners has offered this super bowl promotion. the first two were just for opening kickoff, but with the ravens playing sunday it was for whenever they got the ball, at the start of the game or start of the 2nd half. greg says he had 30 people in his home watching the game. >> everybody went nuts that jacoby jones made this incredible runback and then there was a hush and 10th 2nd later they went oh, boy -- 10 seconds later they went oh, boy, wen somebody is up the creek and they -- we know somebody is up the creek and they started pointing at me and laughing. couldn't be happier. >> reporter: sure is something he'll remember. in baltimore bob barnard, fox 5 news. >> thank goodness for that insurance policy, right? >>> coming up next tonight the presidential pitch to the public, president obama hits the road pushing for tighter gun control laws. >> and later tonight a followup to a fox 5 investigation. we told you about to expire retardant chemicals in some couches.
london games. and now according to the associated press and some other sources has been charged with the murder of his 30-year-old girlfriend. she's a model. she was found shot to death at the south african home of oscar pistorius, the double amputee olympic sprinter who's known as the blade runner. the name of the suspected shooter has not been revealed, but a 26-year-old man, a man the same age as pistorius, has been taken into custody. a court hearing is set for later today. so we're still getting information about what happened. >> yeah. >> some people are suggesting he mistook her for an intruder. others are saying that may just be what he told the police when they walked in and found the scene. you can't overstate how shocking this is. he's not just your average runner. he's an international icon, an inspiration to a lot of people. >> yeah. >> he came out. he had won gold in a lot of paralip pipar paralymp paralympics. he was already a hero for that. then to qualify for the olympics in loss done was historic. he ran in the 4x400. >> you were in london. this was the story.
with the very latest from london and good day to you, annabelle. new numbers on how big this was and the kind of damage it did. pretty outstanding. >> reporter: that's right, alex. good morning. a big cleanup going on in chelybinsk. the shock wave blew out windows in more than 4,000 buildings. this is a really cold area. local officials promised they will get all the windows fixed within a week. that's a long time to wait when your midday temperature there is about 10 fahrenheit. so lots of people out there today, busy blocking up the windows and the glazers will be extremely busy the next few days. 1,200 people injured, 200 children. 15 remain in the hospital, 1 in a coma. most injuries caused by flying, breaking glass as you can see in the pictures. what happened, the meteor flew across the sky, everybody saw the strange light, ran to the windows and, boom, all the windows -- the huge blast and the glass shattered in those winos across this area. there were also reports that a chunk had fallen into a lake, a chunk of the meteor. divers are busy looking for the large chunk under this ice-cru
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